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Submarine Warfare in the Atlantic: The History ...
9,95 € *
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Danger prowled under both the cold gray waters of the North Sea and the shimmering blue waves of the tropical Atlantic during World War II as Adolf Hitler's Third Reich attempted to strangle Allied shipping lanes with U-boat attacks. German and British submarines combed the vast oceanic battlefield for prey, while scientists developed new technologies and countermeasures. Submarine warfare began tentatively during the American Civil War (though the Netherlands and England made small prototypes centuries earlier, and the American sergeant Ezra Lee piloted the one-man Turtle vainly against HMS Eagle near New York in 1776). Britisher Robert Whitehead's invention of the torpedo introduced the weapon later used most frequently by submarines. Steady improvements to Whitehead's design led to the military torpedoes deployed against shipping during both World Wars. World War I witnessed the First Battle of the Atlantic, when the Kaiserreich unleashed its U-boats against England. During the war's 52.5 months, the German submarines sent much of the British merchant marine to the bottom. Indeed, German reliance on U-boats in both World War I and World War II stemmed largely from their nation's geography. The Germans eventually recognized the primacy of the Royal Navy and its capacity to blockade Germany's short coastline in the event of war. While the British could easily interdict surface ships, submarines slipped from their Kiel or Hamburg anchorages unseen, able to prey upon England's merchant shipping. During World War I, German U-boats operated solo except on one occasion. Initially, the British and nations supplying England with food and materiel scattered vessels singly across the ocean, making them vulnerable to the lone submarines. However, widespread late war re-adoption of the convoy system tipped the odds in the surface ships' favor, as one U-boat skipper described: "The oceans at once became bare and empty; for long periods at a time the U 1. Language: English. Narrator: Dan Gallagher. Audio sample: http://samples.audible.de/bk/acx0/073327/bk_acx0_073327_sample.mp3. Digital audiobook in aax.

Anbieter: Audible
Stand: 07.06.2020
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Submarine Warfare in World War I: The History a...
9,95 € *
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Submarine warfare began tentatively during the American Civil War (though the Netherlands and England made small prototypes centuries earlier, and the American sergeant Ezra Lee piloted the one-man "Turtle" vainly against HMS Eagle near New York in 1776). Robert Whitehead's invention of the torpedo introduced the weapon later used most frequently by submarines. Steady improvements to Whitehead's design led to the military torpedoes deployed against shipping during both World Wars. World War I witnessed the First Battle of the Atlantic, when the Kaiserreich unleashed its U-boats against England. During the war, the German submarines sent much of the British merchant marine to the bottom. Indeed, German reliance on U-boats in both World War I and World War II stemmed largely from their nation's geography. The Germans eventually recognized the superiority of the Royal Navy and its capacity to blockade Germany's short coastline in the event of war. While the British could easily interdict surface ships, submarines slipped from their Kiel or Hamburg anchorages unseen, able to prey upon England's merchant shipping. The sleek hunter-killers lurking beneath the waves, using periscopes to close in unnoticed on their prey, added a new, nerve-wracking element to naval warfare. The mere threat of submarine attack immediately altered naval tactics and strategies employed by both the Western Allies and the Central Powers, shifting them towards a more cautious approach, especially at the war’s start when the submarine threat remained untested. During World War I, German U-boats operated solo except on one occasion. Initially, the British and nations supplying England with food and materiel scattered vessels singly across the ocean, making them vulnerable to the lone submarines. However, widespread late war re-adoption of the convoy system tipped the odds in the surface ships' favor, as one U-boat skipper described: "The oceans at once became bare 1. Language: English. Narrator: Bill Hare. Audio sample: http://samples.audible.de/bk/acx0/110814/bk_acx0_110814_sample.mp3. Digital audiobook in aax.

Anbieter: Audible
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Robert Christian Avé-Lallemant
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High Quality Content by WIKIPEDIA articles! Robert Christian Barthold Avé-Lallemant (July 25, 1812 October 10, 1884) was a German physician and explorer who was a native of Lübeck. He was a brother to criminologist Friedrich Christian Benedict Avé-Lallemant (1809-1892) and music critic Theodore Avé-Lallemant (1806-1890). He earned his medical doctorate from the University of Kiel, and in 1836 relocated to Brazil, where he subsequently became director of a sanatorium for yellow fever patients in Rio de Janeiro. In 1855 he returned to Germany, and enlisted as ship's doctor for the Austrian Novara expedition. After the SMS Novara had crossed the Atlantic Ocean to South America in 1857, Avé-Lallemant disembarked in Rio de Janeiro, leaving the expedition. During his second time in Brazil he spent approximately two years performing extensive exploration of the country, having the support of Emperor Dom Pedro.

Anbieter: Dodax
Stand: 07.06.2020
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German Submarine U-331
39,00 € *
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Please note that the content of this book primarily consists of articles available from Wikipedia or other free sources online. German submarine U-331 was a Type VIIC U-boat of the German Kriegsmarine during World War II. The submarine was laid down on 26 January 1940 at the Nordseewerke yard at Emden, launched on 20 December 1940, and commissioned on 31 March 1941 under the command of Oberleutnant zur See Freiherr Hans-Diedrich von Tiesenhausen. U-331's first patrol took her from Kiel on 2 July 1941, out into the mid-Atlantic, before arriving at Lorient, France on 19 August.

Anbieter: Dodax
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Bridging Divides
326,00 CHF *
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Maritime canals dissolve natural barriers to the dispersal of marine organisms, thus providing novel opportunities for natural dispersal, as well as for shipping-mediated transport. The introduction of alien species has proved to be one of the most profound and damaging of anthropogenic deeds - with both ecological and economic costs. This book is the first to assess the impacts of the world’s three principal maritime canals – the Kiel, the Panama, the Suez – as invasion corridors for alien biota. These three canals differ in their hydrological regimes, the types of biotas they connect, and in their permeability to invasions. Dr. Stephan Gollasch was involved in the first European ship sampling programme on ballast water, tank sediments and ship hull fouling (1992-1996). His PhD is world-wide the first thesis based on ballast water sampling. In addition to laboratory and desk studies he spent more than 125 days at sea during several biological surveys and joint ships on their voyages through the Kiel and Suez Canals. Due to the international aspect of biological invasions Dr. Gollasch became a member of several international working groups: International Council for the Exploration of the Sea (ICES); International Maritime Organization (IMO), and the Baltic Marine Biologists (BMB). As an independent consultant he is today involved projects related to biological invasions (e.g. ballast water treatment, ship sampling, risk assessment). Recently he was involved in the development of risk assessments and ballast water management scenarios for the European Atlantic coast, North, Baltic, Caspian and Mediterranean Seas. Dr. Bella Galil is a Senior Research Scientist at the National Institute of Oceanography, Israel. Her main research interests are the anthropogenic changes occurring in the Levantine marine biota, and the impact of alien species on the Mediterranean ecosystem. She has conducted numerous studies and surveys off the Israeli coast monitoring the benthic biota from the intertidal to the bathyal. She co-chairs the scientific committee of marine ecosystems of the International Commission for Scientific Exploration of the Mediterranean (CIESM), and is a member of the Invasive Species Scientific Committee, IUCN. Galil published over 130 papers in scientific journals and co-edited a volume of the 'CIESM Atlas of Exotic species in the Mediterranean'. Recently she coordinated the drafting of Guidelines for controlling the vectors of introduction into the Mediterranean of non-indigenous species and invasive marine species for the UNEP Mediterranean Action Plan Regional Activity Centre for Specially Protected Areas RAC/SPA. Dr. Andrew Cohen is the Director of the Biological Invasions Program at the San Francisco Estuary Institute in Oakland, California. His research has focused on the extent, impacts and vectors of aquatic invasions. He has organized and led rapid assessment surveys for exotic marine species in various localities including one at both ends of the Panama Canal. He helped write California's first ballast water law in 1999, and recently helped develop ballast water discharge standards for the state that seem likely to be enacted this year. He also drafted a petition from the research community that led to a U.S. ban on importing the 'Killer Seaweed' Caulerpa taxifolia, and provided technical assistance to a recently successful lawsuit that will force ballast water discharges into U.S. waters to be regulated as biological pollutants under the U.S. Clean Water Act. For his work he has received a Pew Marine Conservation Fellowship and the San Francisco BayKeeper's Environmental Achievement Award.  

Anbieter: Orell Fuessli CH
Stand: 07.06.2020
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Geology of the Northwest African Continental Ma...
191,00 CHF *
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The Northwest African and the conjugate Northeast American con tinental margins provide excellent examples of mature passive continental margins which record in their thick sediment cover the birth and evolution of the Atlantic Ocean Basins during the past 200 million years. Due to a dense net of single- and multichannel seismic reflection lines, numerous Deep Sea Drill ing Project (DSDP) sites and petroleum exploration wells, and the well-known onshore geology, the Northwest African margin is one of the bes't-documen ted margins of the world. A particu lar advantage of this margin is that its coastal basins are well exposed and accessible for detailed stratigraphic studies and onshore-offshore correlations, whereas the Mesozoic-Ceno zoic marginal basins off eastern North America underlie only the present continental shelf and slope. During the past decade, the Northwest African margin was stu died in great detail, particularly by the Woods Hole Oceano graphic Institution, Lamont-Doherty Geological Observatory, Imperial College London, Shell Internationale Petroleum Maat schappij (Den Haag), Kiel University, and the Bundesanstalt fiir Geowissenschaften und Rohstoffe (BGR) at Hannover. A num ber of important synthesis papers summarized these results; e. g. , Summerhayes et al. , 1971; Dillon and Sougy, 1974; Seibold and Hinz, 1974; Uchupi et al. , 1976; Lehner and de Ruiter, 1977 (all quoted in the references of Seibold, this Vol. ).

Anbieter: Orell Fuessli CH
Stand: 07.06.2020
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U-Boat 1936-45 (Type Viia, B, C and Type VIIC/4...
43,90 CHF *
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An insight into the design, construction and operation of the feared World War 2 German Type VIIC U-boat. The German Type VIIC U-boat, scourge of Allied shipping convoys during the Second World War, was the workhorse of the German U-boat force. With some 568 Type VIIs in use between 1940 and 1945 it was a potent fighting vessel that could hunt for long periods in the far reaches of the western and southern Atlantic. Centrepiece of the Haynes U-boat Manual is the sole surviving example of a Type VIIC U-boat, U-995, which is on display at the German Naval Memorial near Kiel in northern Germany.

Anbieter: Orell Fuessli CH
Stand: 07.06.2020
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U-Boat 1936-45 (Type Viia, B, C and Type VIIC/4...
33,99 € *
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An insight into the design, construction and operation of the feared World War 2 German Type VIIC U-boat. The German Type VIIC U-boat, scourge of Allied shipping convoys during the Second World War, was the workhorse of the German U-boat force. With some 568 Type VIIs in use between 1940 and 1945 it was a potent fighting vessel that could hunt for long periods in the far reaches of the western and southern Atlantic. Centrepiece of the Haynes U-boat Manual is the sole surviving example of a Type VIIC U-boat, U-995, which is on display at the German Naval Memorial near Kiel in northern Germany.

Anbieter: Thalia AT
Stand: 07.06.2020
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Bridging Divides
237,99 € *
ggf. zzgl. Versand

Maritime canals dissolve natural barriers to the dispersal of marine organisms, thus providing novel opportunities for natural dispersal, as well as for shipping-mediated transport. The introduction of alien species has proved to be one of the most profound and damaging of anthropogenic deeds - with both ecological and economic costs. This book is the first to assess the impacts of the world’s three principal maritime canals – the Kiel, the Panama, the Suez – as invasion corridors for alien biota. These three canals differ in their hydrological regimes, the types of biotas they connect, and in their permeability to invasions. Dr. Stephan Gollasch was involved in the first European ship sampling programme on ballast water, tank sediments and ship hull fouling (1992-1996). His PhD is world-wide the first thesis based on ballast water sampling. In addition to laboratory and desk studies he spent more than 125 days at sea during several biological surveys and joint ships on their voyages through the Kiel and Suez Canals. Due to the international aspect of biological invasions Dr. Gollasch became a member of several international working groups: International Council for the Exploration of the Sea (ICES); International Maritime Organization (IMO), and the Baltic Marine Biologists (BMB). As an independent consultant he is today involved projects related to biological invasions (e.g. ballast water treatment, ship sampling, risk assessment). Recently he was involved in the development of risk assessments and ballast water management scenarios for the European Atlantic coast, North, Baltic, Caspian and Mediterranean Seas. Dr. Bella Galil is a Senior Research Scientist at the National Institute of Oceanography, Israel. Her main research interests are the anthropogenic changes occurring in the Levantine marine biota, and the impact of alien species on the Mediterranean ecosystem. She has conducted numerous studies and surveys off the Israeli coast monitoring the benthic biota from the intertidal to the bathyal. She co-chairs the scientific committee of marine ecosystems of the International Commission for Scientific Exploration of the Mediterranean (CIESM), and is a member of the Invasive Species Scientific Committee, IUCN. Galil published over 130 papers in scientific journals and co-edited a volume of the 'CIESM Atlas of Exotic species in the Mediterranean'. Recently she coordinated the drafting of Guidelines for controlling the vectors of introduction into the Mediterranean of non-indigenous species and invasive marine species for the UNEP Mediterranean Action Plan Regional Activity Centre for Specially Protected Areas RAC/SPA. Dr. Andrew Cohen is the Director of the Biological Invasions Program at the San Francisco Estuary Institute in Oakland, California. His research has focused on the extent, impacts and vectors of aquatic invasions. He has organized and led rapid assessment surveys for exotic marine species in various localities including one at both ends of the Panama Canal. He helped write California's first ballast water law in 1999, and recently helped develop ballast water discharge standards for the state that seem likely to be enacted this year. He also drafted a petition from the research community that led to a U.S. ban on importing the 'Killer Seaweed' Caulerpa taxifolia, and provided technical assistance to a recently successful lawsuit that will force ballast water discharges into U.S. waters to be regulated as biological pollutants under the U.S. Clean Water Act. For his work he has received a Pew Marine Conservation Fellowship and the San Francisco BayKeeper's Environmental Achievement Award.  

Anbieter: Thalia AT
Stand: 07.06.2020
Zum Angebot